CitizenScience.Gov segment on Wilson Center NOW

This week the General Services Administration (GSA) and the Wilson Center launched citizenscience.gov, a new central hub for citizen science and crowdsourcing initiatives in the public sector. The site will catalog activity and provide tools for the conduct of citizen science projects. Anne Bowser, Co-Director of the Commons Lab at the Wilson Center explains the goals and potential of the project in this edition of Wilson Center NOW.

Guest

Anne Bowser is a Senior Program Associate with the Science and Technology Innovation Program (STIP). She co-directs the Commons Lab, which takes as its mission mobilizing public participation and innovation in science, technology, and policy. Anne also leads the Wilson Center’s participation in a research project on encouraging bilateral cooperation in science and technology innovation between the US and the EU. She also supports the Wilson Center’s initiative on serious games.

Anne’s personal research focuses on understanding the role that technology plays in citizen science and crowdsourcing. She recently defended her PhD at the University of Maryland College of Information Studies, where her dissertation explored a cooperative approach to designing Floracaching, a geocaching game for biodiversity data collection created to mobilize participation in university communities. Anne is also working on an NSF-funded project to study location privacy in citizen science. Finally, she supports the international practice of citizen science as the co-founder of a data and metadata interoperability working group of the Citizen Science Association.

Host
John Milewski is the executive producer and managing editor of Wilson Center NOW and also serves as director of Wilson Center ON DEMAND digital programming. Previously he served as host and producer of Dialogue at the Wilson Center and Close Up on C-SPAN. He also teaches a course on politics and media for Penn State’s Washington Program.

 

– See more at: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/article/launch-citizensciencegov#sthash.lzpLI2Wk.dpuf

Foul and Filthy Rivers, Water School and Hunting Plants: Citizen Science in China

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Beijing River Bend taken by Peter Morgan (source)

By Elizabeth Tyson and Kate Logan (Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs)

Blackened rivers snake the ring roads of Beijing, carrying pollution and often smelly water from one end of the city to another. The most polluted of these have been dubbed “foul and filthy rivers” (黑臭河) by China’s Ministry of the Environment (MEP) and Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development (MOHURD). However, the government has decided to clean these up – and it is enlisting the help of the public to do so.

The Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs (IPE) is an independent civil society organization based in Beijing dedicated to the transparency and disclosure of environmental information. The group’s founder, former journalist, author, and 2012 recipient of the Goldman Environmental Prize, Ma Jun has written prolifically on environmental issues in China and created the country’s first pollution map database. IPE’s online air and water pollution maps use government data not only to show water and air pollution quality in every province and prefecture in China, but also to shine a light on specific emissions of factories, waste treatment plants, and factory farms. These days IPE is embarking on a new project to amplify a unique MEP and MOHURD crowdsourcing initiative that aims to tap citizens in Beijing to identify the foul and filthy rivers in the city.

The government has set targets for cleaning up the capital’s worst waterways: by 2020, the percentage of waters in built urban areas designated as “foul and filthy” must be contained to less than 10 percent and cleaned up completely by 2030. MEP and MOHURD kicked off this undertaking just after the 2016 Chinese New Year holiday by publishing the names and detailed statistics about the water bodies designated for clean-up. IPE has since integrated this information into the new 3.0 version of its Blue Map app (created by IPE to provide information on pollution) that will launch later this month, allowing the public to see exactly where these polluted waters are located.

But this initiative is not only about making information available to the public – it also capitalizes on the power of citizens to assist in clean-up efforts. To that end, MEP has opened a public account on We Chat (a wildly popular Chinese app that is a cross between What’s App and Facebook) where the public can submit photographs and descriptions of any waters that they believe should be designated as “foul and filthy,” guaranteeing that each report will receive an official response in seven business days or less. Meanwhile, IPE’s revised Blue Map app includes a “foul and filthy river” module; more than 3 million users have downloaded the app and, hopefully, even more users will download the new version once it is released.


The Commons Lab in collaboration with the Wilson Center’s China Environment Forum gave a series of lectures and workshops on citizen science and communication techniques in Beijing two weeks ago. First, we introduced the citizen science field to 13 small environmental and health NGOs based in Beijing and western China. Then we stopped off at a hip bar in downtown Beijing to present to a room full of energetic Chinese and foreign energy and environmental workers of the Beijing Energy Network (BEN). Our last stop was Renmin University, where we discussed the potential for citizen science in natural resources. The feedback was tremendous and it’s clear that citizen science is growing in China and organizations are eager to expand their public participation in environmental issues.

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Elizabeth Tyson presenting to the Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs
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Global Environmental Institute presenting on one of their citizen science project ideas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are just a few of the stellar citizen science initiatives either poised to begin or underway that we learned about:

The Beijing-based Global Environment Institute is developing a climate change monitoring and adaptation citizen science pilot project in Western China, in the Sanjiangyun (Three Rivers) Nature Reserve in Qinghai Provence. This remote region provides drinking water for 1.4 billion people and contains fragile, yet critical, ecosystems. Information about the state of this environment is difficult to obtain due to its remoteness, and the region is only visited by the nomadic residents. This project aims to train the semi-nomadic herders how to monitor their local environment so scientists and environmental policymakers can make decisions based on more accurate and real-time data.

Botany wins for the longest standing citizen science project in China. Run by a collaboration of researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, this project encourages naturalist enthusiasts to record observations of plants, and submit them the researchers which are then uploaded to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility. It also serves as a discussion forum and RSS feed on relevant citizen science work from around the world.

Finally, the Chinese Water School is a primarily educational project run by the Chinese NGO Shangri-la Institute for Sustainable Communities based in the mountains of Yunnan Province in southwest China, which educates teachers how to collect water samples who then teach their students. The Ministry of Education in China administers volunteer certificates for children who participate in activities outside of their school. It was suggested during the BEN talk that a citizen science certificate could be created to encourage student participation in projects like these.

Not surprisingly, a lot of the challenges facing the projects here in China are similar to those faced by other countries: lack of funding, cracks in the project-to-decision-making pipeline; data quality standards vary across different projects; lack of interoperability of the collected data; and little knowledge about other projects.

However, China is lucky in that a number of these projects are still growing and some of the project ideas have yet to create databases, so the opportunity to build these with interoperability in mind is still wide open.

Despite the differences in Chinese policy and governance from Western countries, it appears as if the Ministry of Environmental Protection is eager to involve the public in solving environmental problems and environmental information is becoming increasingly available thanks to third party institutions like IPE. Through engaging the local and provincial governments, these nascent citizen science projects can encourage the use of their data and analysis by the MEP in collaboratively solving China’s environmental problems.

Open Data in the President’s Budget for 2017

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The Obama administration seems serious about open data. The administration’s recently released budget for fiscal year 2017 highlights the federal government’s commitment to open data, not only for the science community but also for economic development. Specifically, the section titled “Economic Growth: Opening Government-Funded Data and Research to the Public to Spur Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Job Growth” focuses on how federal government investments in making federally funded research and development (R&D) projects accessible to the public will lead to technological innovation, job growth, and industry creation.

In the budget, the administration argues that granting the public access to intellectual property and scientific knowledge leads to innovation. With the open data from government-funded projects, citizens and businesses can build upon pre-existing research, resulting in technological development. The Data.gov website, for example, offers more than 188,000 data sets on topics ranging from healthcare to agriculture. Using this information, external groups have created applications to improve accessibility for people with disabilities and help food truck vendors improve their sales. Currently, the government has already taken the first step in expanding the public’s access to datasets with initiatives like Project Open Data, but the additional investment proposed in the FY2017 budget could allow for further independent research and innovation.

Second, the increased availability and accessibility to open data will create new jobs and industries, according to the FY2017 budget. Moreover, federal R&D data is oftentimes successfully leveraged by academics and entrepreneurs. For example, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has long collaborated with the private sector to conduct experiments on the International Space Station. After NASA granted private researchers access to their findings, the researchers were able to create a whole new industry in small satellites.

Continue reading “Open Data in the President’s Budget for 2017”

EVENT: The Year Ahead in Environment and Energy

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Yosemite National Park (source)

With the recent Paris Climate Conference and the upcoming presidential election already setting the tone, 2016 is set to be a critical year for environment and energy policy.

To better understand these emerging trends and stories, the Science and Technology Innovation Program at the Wilson Center is teaming up with the Environmental Change and Security Program and the Society of Environmental Journalists to host the fourth annual “Year Ahead in Environment and Energy” event from 3:00-5:00 pm on Feb. 11, 2016 at the Wilson Center.

Please join us to hear from reporters and journalists from Huffington Post, National Geographic, Bloomberg BNA, Washington Post, Environment & Energy Daily, and more. This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required: http://pages.wilsoncenter.org/20160211YearAhead.html

A reception will follow sponsored by The Nature Conservancy, Resource Media, Environmental Law Institute, Bloomberg BNA, and the Science and Technology Innovation Program.

 Welcome & Introduction

Meaghan Parker, Senior Writer and Editor, Environmental Change and Security Program

Jeff Burnside, President of the Board, Society of Environmental Journalists

Speakers 

Laura Barron-Lopez, Reporter, Huffington Post

Marla Cone, Senior Editor, National Geographic

Jessica Coomes, Deputy News Director, Bloomberg BNA

Chris Mooney, Reporter, Washington Post

Manuel Quinones, Deputy Director, Environment & Energy Daily

Dean Scott, Senior Reporter for Climate Change, Bloomberg BNA

Matt Weiser, Managing Editor,WaterDeeply.org

Moderator

Tim Wheeler, Reporter, Chesapeake Bay Journal

More information can be found here: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/the-year-ahead-environment-and-energy-2

EVENT: Legal Issues and Intellectual Property Rights in Citizen Science

Capitalizing on the momentum from the recent White House event — which appointed citizen science coordinators in Federal agencies, highlighted legislation introduced in Congress concerning funding mechanisms and clarifying legal and administrative issues to using citizen science, and launched a new Federal toolkit on citizen science and crowdsourcing — the Commons Lab is hosting a panel examining the legal issues affecting federal citizen science and the potential intellectual property rights that could arise from using citizen science.

Toolkit

This panel corresponds with the launch of two new Commons Lab Publications:

As a project manager or researcher conducting citizen science, either at the federal level or in partnership with governmental agencies, there are certain issues like the Information Quality Act that will impact citizen science and crowdsourcing project design. Being aware of these issues prior to initiating projects will save time and provide avenues for complying with or “lawfully evading” potential barriers. The Commons Lab web-enabled policy tool will also be demonstrated at the event. This tool helps users navigate the complicated laws discussed in Robert Gellman’s report on legal issues affecting citizen science.

Intellectual property rights in the age of open source, open data, open science and also, citizen science, are complicated and require significant forethought before embarking on a citizen science project. Please join us to hear from two experts on the legal barriers and intellectual property rights issues in citizen science and collect a hard copy of the reports.

Speakers

Teresa Scassa, Canada Research Chair in Information Law and Professor in the Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa
Haewon Chung, Doctoral Candidate in Law, University of Ottawa
Robert Gellman, Privacy and Information Policy Consultant in Washington, DC

Moderator
Jay Benforado, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Get involved in the Sustainable Development Goals and create your own project!

This blog post originally appeared on one.org, written by By Ruba Ishak, ONE Senior Research Assistant

We all have a role to play in creating a sustainable future for us and our planet. Tracking these 17 goals on eradicating extreme poverty, gender inequality, disease, and social injustice is not a small task. We need new ideas on how to do this and how to empower people to get involved.

A flag to represent Goal 11, Sustainable Cities and Communities, is raised in Sydney, Australia, to support the UN Global Goals for Sustainable Development. Credit: Shane Thaw
A flag to represent Goal 11, Sustainable Cities and Communities, is raised in Sydney, Australia, to support the UN Global Goals for Sustainable Development. Credit: Shane Thaw

That’s why the Open Seventeen challenge, an open platform that supports crowdsourcing projects, was launched in May this year. It’s about tapping into the power of your online community–or the one in your backyard—to help you sift through existing datasets (images, scanned text, tweets and more!) to find things that computers can’t pick up.

Today we’re putting out the call for the the second round of the Open Seventeen Challenge, looking for new ideas on how crowdsourcing can help tackle extreme poverty, corruption, and gender inequality. The winning ideas will receive online coaching and technical support to set up a crowdcrafting project and have it go live.

We had some great grassroots ideas come out of the first round and our two winning projects are getting ready to launch their crowdsourcing after graduating from their coaching program run by the GovLab Academy:

Promise 2030, led by John Ranford, is creating a “street guide to sustainable businesses.” Promise 2030 will be piloted in UK towns trying to reduce their CO2 impacts, tackling Global Goal 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities. By crowdsourcing information about local shops and businesses, Promise 2030 wants to accelerate the number of small and medium sized enterprises that record and publish information on their sustainability.
DATAFARMA, led by Janeth Cifuentes and Manuel Mejía, is looking to crowdsource to gather information on Hepatitis C and the use of generic medicines, to make that information easily accessible by people affected by this disease in Colombia and Mexico. The idea is to create a platform that maps disease outbreaks, while also having vital information on associated treatments and patient care. The project will focus on Global Goal 3: Good Health & Well-Being.

The new challenge will run until the end of December 2015 and the winners will be announced in the new year!

The Open Seventeen Challenge is a joint initiative of the research organizations Citizen Cyberlab and GovLab, The ONE Campaign, and the open-source company SciFabric.

Learn about the Global Goals, then find out more about the Open Seventeen challenge and get involved at openseventeen.org!